Who Inspired Us to Read

Carol Robinson:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 Have no recall of this

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 Island of the Blue Dolphins as I could relate to the loneliness of the girl in the novel.  I too felt like I was all alone. Books became my friends.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

It would be reader specific.  If they like Sports it might be The Blind Side.  If they like music it might be a music biography.  If they like the Civil War it might be My Brother Sam is Dead.

David Townsend:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

My Mother, Bonnie Townsend. 

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 “The Wind In the Willows.” It’s one of the first books Mom read to me and inspired a lifelong love of whimsy and fantasy.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

“A Canticle for Leibowitz” by Walter M. Miller, Jr. Sci-Fi stirs the imagination of young readers by taking them to worlds beyond their own. I read this the first time when I was in junior high.

Crystal Miller:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 My Grandma. Starting from a very young age, I would sit in her lap and she would read to me during every visit. It’s something I can always remember looking forward to.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 “Where the Red Fern Grows.” I read that book in elementary school and it was the first book that made me cry. It made me realize just how powerful reading a book could be.

Kim Bryant:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

Two people: my mom and my childhood librarian. Books were around the house growing up and my mom shared with me her love of libraries very early. I distinctly remember the day she took me to get my first library card,  at age 5, in Blackfoot, Idaho. Once my siblings and I had our own library cards, we were allowed to walk to the library without Mom and I quickly became fast friends with Lisa Harrell, who worked at the children’s desk (and 30-odd years later is now Blackfoot’s library director).

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett.  We purchased a copy from a Scholastic Book Order when I was in the third grade.  I still own it (sans the back cover, but does that really matter?) and re-read it at least annually.  There is something so magical about your own special space, where you can pretend your worries and trials don’t exists.  It’s also a story about two things kids crave: independence (Mary grew up with a bevy of servants but now must learn to entertain herself) and attention (Mary develops her first real relationships with Martha, Colin, Dickon, and Ben Weatherstaff).

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

I would recommend A Tale Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz to a reluctant reader. It’s bloody. Really bloody, with a snarky narrator. While not for every reader (some kids tell me it’s too gross for them), we have a hard time keeping our six copies on the shelf -which is unusual for a book that’s been around for 6 years.

Kathleen McVey:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

My mother was the one who was always reading- to herself, and to me and my siblings. Our most cherished birthday or Christmas gift would often  be a new book, and we always had bookshelves by our bedside. Reading before sleep- whether a nap or at nighttime, was always the routine.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

The Nancy Drew series is one I remember most vividly. I could not wait to read each new story and would stay up late at night with a flashlight under the covers- I’m sure my parents knew- and allowed me to “secretly” read…

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Of course, it would depend on the particular interests and aptitude of the reader, but I think the new series, The Eighth Continent, is a great recommendation for its energetic pace and the imaginative characters that keep kids’ interest. Series are a great idea for reluctant readers since there’s a logical next book to read right away.

Kasi Allen:

I don’t have the answers to these questions for myself because I’ve always been a voracious reader, but I often anecdotally share my husband’s experience with reading to parents of young patrons, so I’ll give you those.

He had immense troubles with reading. In first grade, his teacher recommended holding him back because of how poor his reading abilities were. He wouldn’t read for pleasure, he wouldn’t read for class. His mom had him doing phonics exercises after school, but he just wasn’t interested. For his 8th birthday, his uncle gave him some comic books and that changed everything. He read every comic book he could get his hands on, and then moved on to books. His grades improved, he began enjoying school. It is often referred to in the family as “the comic book miracle.” A man who was once placed in special education courses because his teachers just didn’t know how to help him learn now has a master’s degree and is absolutely what we call a “lifelong reader.”

I urge parents of children who have the same relationship with reading that my husband did to try graphic novels. Of course, it may not be the miracle answer to everyone else that it was for my spouse’s parents, but it can’t hurt to try!

Holly Jackson:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 My Mother. She read to us every night for as long as I can remember so it was just a natural progression that I developed a love for reading.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

The Magic Attic Club Books. Because they were books about girls just like me that got to go on these fantastic adventures.  

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Poison Study by. It has a little bit of everything right from the get go. Magic, Fantasy, Adventure, Fighting, Romance and Intrigue. 

Gregory Whitmore:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how? No one that I can think of. My mother probably read to me when I was young, but as soon as I learned my ABCs and began reading at 4 or so, I became voracious.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why? As funny as this is going to sound, it wasn’t a single book, it was  television and movies. I was three or four when I first saw the original Batman television series. Within a few days, I discovered his adventures in comic books at the local grocery store, along with tons of other costumed adventurers. I begged and pleaded with my parents to buy me some. What they bought, I read, re-read and re-re-read– cue the voracious reader again. Even though I couldn’t understand all the words at first, the art, the sense of adventure and the idea of doing good while hidden resonated in me. I read, collected and indexed (think surrogate records here) comics for the better part of 45 years. I also discovered comic strips about this time, including “Peanuts”. I’m still addicted to the daily funnies to this day.

Movies like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Disney’s the Jungle Book—as well as their versions of Peter Pan and Dr. Syn alias the Scarecrow– , 1940s serials (Zorro, Tarzan, Flash Gordon), Robin Hood, the Three Musketeers, various science fiction/Universal monster movies and numerous Warner Brothers cartoons led to my reading Ian Fleming, Rudyard Kipling, Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Howard Pyle, Alexandre Dumas, anything on magic (illusionists and mages) and books starring Flash Gordon, the Shadow, Zorro, Tarzan, Doc Savage, John Carter and Sherlock Holmes. My fascination with disasters like the Hindenburg crash, The 1920 Wall Street bombing, the Chicago Fire of 1871, the War of the Worlds radio scare, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse in 1940, and the Tunguska explosion in 1908 among others led me to read the newspapers daily for a long time.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why? Collection of comics strips, comic books and graphic novels are very easy for non-readers to get into. Complete stories, great art, continuing characters, and full of adventure. What’s not to like? I also used to read dictionaries and encyclopedias, as well as tons of other non-fiction books. Some readers don’t like fiction, so these are some options. The first prose book I can remember reading beginning to end was in second or third grade: “Sprockets” by Alexander Key.

Rubie Gallegos:

My mom gave me a love of reading even though she did not like to read I can remember sitting on her lap while she read Mike Mulligan’s steam shovel and The Little house to me, I still love these books.  My aunt was also instrumental she was a reader and encouraged me to read everything there was no “reading levels” I would sit by her and she would tell me all the words I didn’t know.  

I struggled to learn read but always loved it, as a 4-5th grader I loved Little house on the prairie and Island of the blue dolphins

I recommend books to students everyday lately I send a lot of reluctant readers to Geronimo Srtilton, and Who was biographies 

Tania Harden:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 It was more circumstances than a specific person.  I grew up in rural Indiana in the early 70’s.  We had no cable and only got ABC, CBS, NBC and PBS on TV.  I had no siblings close to my age and no friends who lived close.  I learned to entertain myself by reading and playing by myself.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 The first book I remember learning how to read was “Little Red Riding Hood” Golden Books.  I was about 4 yrs old and had the mumps.  I was bored and taught myself how to read while I was sick.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

It depends on his/her interests and age.  My son was crazy about trains when he was little, so we read every Thomas the Tank Engine book we could find.

Sharla Jensen:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

My mother. She read books to us, took us to the library, kept many books on various subjects in our home, and read voraciously herself. When she read a particularly good book she would share it with us to read too, and then discuss the book with us.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

There were a few books that stand out. When I was first learning to read, I loved Go Dog Go. As I got older, I think the Chronicles of Prydain series and the Narnia Series really helped me learn to love to read.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Some of my kids were a little reluctant to read as they got older. The books that they all enjoyed and couldn’t hardly put down were the Ranger’s Apprentice series.

Kristi Haman:

Growing up, I watched my father read history books so I did the same. I still love history and select all of the nonfiction books for Ada Community Library.

My love for reading and poetry was ignited by Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein. I still have the old beat up copy that my little sister scribbled in. This book inspired me to create a new version of the book with my own poems and cartoons.

I would recommend juvenile nonfiction books to reluctant readers. The reader can select subjects that they are interested in (Legos, animals, Star Wars, biographies, Minecraft, gross science, silly jokes, How to draw, etc.) and the pictures reel them in every time. Suddenly, they forget that they hate reading!

Christine Hoxie:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how? 

My mother:  bedtime stories, and school librarians because they were passionate about their job

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why? 

Madeline L’Engle was introduced to me through the library , the diverse, weird , twisted writing of hers really sparked my imagination and took me to another world, probably because I couldn’t handle all the changes of 9/13 year old girl : puberty, relocating, the list goes on

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

 I would recommend a humorous author only because it might grab attention more than guessing on a reluctant readers preference in reading material, also a shorter story. Perhaps start them with a series and see where it goes from there. I love Junie B. Jones for a boy perhaps diary of a wimpy kid

Carly Finseth (@drcarlyfin):

@idaholibrarian @BSULibrary “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle. It was magical and let my imagination run wild.

George Williams:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

I’d give my entire family the credit for my love of reading.  My family was very messed up.  Going to the library and reading were escapes from my drunken father, codependent mother, and bi-polar brother.  The library in Idaho Falls was a safe place I could go to sit quietly in a corner and read so I could get away from my family.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

There was no single book that ignited a love for reading in me.  I was particularly fond of the STAR TREK novelizations by James Blish and Alan Dean Foster and I also read the LORD OF THE RINGS books when I was in the third grade.  I also enjoyed Robert A. Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke and Ray Bradbury – almost everything I read by them was good.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

My readers advisory experience tells me that I don’t have an answer for this question.  I find that finding the right book for someone is so individualized that I don’t have one or two titles that I pull out of a hat to recommend to everyone who wants a recommendation.  It’s better to have a dialogue with a patron to find out what they’re interested in and then find the book that fits their interests.  Nancy Perl’s “Doorways” concept is not a horrible way to start out with adults and teens, but for the age group that you seem to be interested in, I’m not sure I would have a strategy beyond talking to the child and pulling a bunch of books off of the shelf with them and looking at a bunch of stuff.

Shelly Doty:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 My 9th grade English teacher, Ms. Katherine Krueger. She encouraged having our own opinions about what we read, not the standard or acceptable opinions. We were free to think whatever we wanted – and write about it the same way.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 I Will Fight No More Forever by Merrill Beal. It was due to Ms. Krueger. She let us discuss our thoughts openly in class with no repercussions due to our own language use or differing opinions.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Harry Potter series. My daughter was not interested in reading. She learned in first grade she didn’t have to read because the computer told her what to do. She truly believed that. In fifth grade she picked up the first Harry Potter book – and read every single one. Since then she has been hooked on reading.

There are other series that would be good for younger readers like Hank the Cow Dog. Finding a good series is great because it allows the child to continue on with characters they enjoy instead of stopping and not being able to find another book.

Vampire, werewolf, zombie or hero series are good. The House of Night series, Mercy Thompson series,  Hunger Game series, Alex Rider series, John Sandford Prey series, Abigail Roux series, C.J. Box series, Stephanie Plum series, J.D. Robb series. 

I’ve read more teen and adult series than younger child series.

Carol Mayer:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

  My passion for reading was ignited by my mother and father.  I do not remember how other than they read to me or listened to me read.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

  I do not remember the first books I read.  My mom and dad said I started to read when I was 4.  I do not remember a time when I wasn’t reading.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Any Dr. Seuss children’s book because they are simple and fun.

Patricia Rose:

My mom ignited my love of reading with her passion and dedication to sharing it’s importance. We grew up with regular trips to the community library (which at the time was located in our local high school). She read to us every night, and made sure we were always stocked with new and exciting books to read. She is still a strong member of the community and donates her time to the library, the schools, and the Veterans Home on top of holding full time employment. She sits on the library board, and has even had a therapy dog (until he passed) who made regular visits to participate in the Tails for Tales program and assist children who struggle with reading aloud. My mom is an incredible lady. I aspire to be just like her.

The books I am most passionate about are the Little House on the Prairie series. They sucked me in, and I find myself returning to them like an old friend every couple of years.

Any book can help suck in a reluctant reader, if it is something that interests them and is presented with passion. Find out what interests a kiddo, and then honestly and enthusiastically give them a couple of options. Follow up. Sometimes having an interested adult can make all the difference. Not everyone naturally loves reading, but everyone can have a warm and meaningful relationship with books if presented by someone who sincerely cares.

Ann Misner:

As a child I had a difficult time learning to read, as we were not taught phonics and had to memorize thousands of words by sight. I became very ill when I was twelve and spent the summer in bed.  We did not have TV and the only entertainment was reading.  I began to read the Black Stallion series and the Secret Garden.  It was not until I began to teach phonic and  understand the structure of the written word that reading became as necessary as breathing.  I love to read as often as I may and always carry a book where ever I go.

Sandy Evans:

  • What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

My Mom and older Brother. They read to me a lot.

Also, my folks had a mini family library, and a bunch of bean bags that stacked on top of each other, to sit on by the book shelf with good lighting. It was called our reading corner.

  • What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

Dr. Seuss books.  Because I had some health issues; “Sam I am” was read to me a lot and it was an encouragement to help me eat.

  • What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

It depends on the age.

Any colorful books, then add a word here and there for 0 to preschool.

Dr. Seuss, Marc Brown, Bernstein Bears, for the preschool thru 1 or 2nd grade (they are good ones for learning to read and any phonic books).

Any humor books like Amelia Bedila, Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, Hank the Cow dog: to 3/4 grade thru middle school. (When my son was in 3 or 4th grade I was struggling trying to find a type of book or series for him to like. A substitute introduced Hank the Cow dog to him. That was a hit.)

In High School most of the students have found a certain series they like in- Mysteries, Romance, Thrill, Army base, Science Fiction, etc

Shasta Bolduc:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 My Kindergarten teacher – she would use puppets and make up different voices for each character which made it seem real.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

 Pollyanna was the first chapter book I remember reading all the way through and then feeling so good about both finishing it and enjoying the story.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Science Fair by Dave Berry and Ridley Pearson – It’s a chapter book but not lengthy and it’s funny story for all ages to enjoy

Kathy Callahan:

It was me that ignited a love for reading in me as a child merely by learning how.  I remember when I really “got it,” when reading came easily to me and how happy and proud I felt.

There were many books, Nancy Drew, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, The Adventure of Huckberry Finn, but one memory stands out:  Reading A Secret Garden early in the morning while still in bed and eating Junior Mints.

I retired from Boise Public in June 2015 after 16 years as a librarian.

Carolyn Todd:

1&2.       My mom and dad always read to me, so I was eager to start reading on my own. Then, the summer between first and second grade, I had to rest in my room after lunch. My mom gave me the Nancy Drew “Clue in the Crumbling Wall,” and told me to read it during rest time. I never looked back. Nancy Drew books weren’t in public libraries back then, so most of my allowance went to purchasing new mysteries.

3.            Are you my mother? By P.D. Eastman (Dr. Seuss). Easy to read but still manages to be hilarious.

Jean Hauritz:

> What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how? My

father. He read and wrote poetry to my sister and I as young children.  My favorite was Mullga Bill’s Bicycle.

>

> What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why? The

> Wind

in the Willows. My mother read and reread this to my sister and I until I finally read and reread it to myself and my own children.

>

> What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Funny poetry. Poems can be short or long, funny, sad and much more.  My favorite for kids would be Alan  Katz’ I’m still here in the bathtub.

Jennifer Hills:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

I was lucky enough to have parents and grandparents who were readers – though each in their own way. My Dad was a voracious reader, reading anything – fiction, nonfiction, magazines, cereal boxes – whatever he could get his hands on. My Grandmother was a big romance reader, and she was never without a book in her hands. My Mom didn’t always read for pleasure, but she loved to read to me, and she was great at creating different voices and expressions. And, my Grandfather read the newspaper – back to front – every day. With those four as role models, it’s no wonder I love to read!

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

I don’t remember a specific book when I was really young, but we had a collection of the Golden Books. I loved the Poky Little Puppy, The Saggy Baggy Elephant, and anything with Mother Goose rhymes. I think I still have a couple of copies – and they’re probably older than me!

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Books with rhythm and rhyme are always great to start with. Music and repetition are great learning tools, so I think I’d try something along those lines to draw them in, like Chicka Chicka Boom Boom or Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Books that have a twist are also fun – like There’s a Monster at the End of This Book or My Little Sister Ate One Hare. I think children will respond to anything that gets them laughing, dancing, or repeating – and adults, too. (Of course, I’m an Adult Librarian, but I do have a niece and three nephews that I constantly experiment with…)

Vivian Milius:

Both of my parents read aloud to us.  All of my grade school teachers read aloud to us.

My parents did not take me to the public library.  When I was in 5th grade we moved to a small town in which the library was within walking distance for me.  That is how I discovered the OZ books by L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson. When I began junior high school in a larger town I used the school library.  

Two of my six children were reluctant to read.  I found out later that one of them observed that I read aloud less to older siblings who were reading and this child did not want to lose that one-on-one time together.  Through her I learned how children cope with SSR (Silent Sustained Reading time at school) when they are not yet proficient at reading.  This child made it a summer project to get her youngest sibling to read.  The youngest child was in 5th grade and not reading.  What the older sibling did was to check out five very different books, one of them being Artemis Fowl.  Well, that was the book that turned my youngest into a reader.  I might add here that the first reluctant reader is now a college graduate and the youngest reluctant reader was on the high school honor roll and is now attending college.

I have a friend who suggested that reluctant readers (especially boys) find a younger person to read aloud to — either picture books, beginning readers, or comics.  

One of my children struggled with dyslexia so she read books while listening to audio books.  She got all her “AR” points in this way.  She too is now a college graduate.

My child who was our best reader had a third grade teacher who gave a sticker for each book read.  Even though she was in third grade a fully capable of reading more difficult books, she read hundreds of emergent readers either to herself or to a younger sibling.  She felt very successful and was recognized for all the stickers.  I am so glad this teacher did not demand that she read books on her reading level.  She was soon reading on grade level and more!

Another one of my children was in fourth grade and still reading (and loving) the Magic Tree House series and then The Secrets of Droon series.  I thought she was missing out on so many good books and in parent teacher conferences brought this up with her teacher.  He assured me that she would move on soon enough and told me not to worry.  He was right!  By the next year she was reading more substantial books.

Kath Ann Hendricks:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

  My mother.  She was an avid reader and would not only  bring home stacks of books to read herself, but took us to the library, which was about a 30 minute drive from our home.  We lived in the Santa Cruz Mountains and our closest library was the Felton Branch of the Santa Cruz Public Libraries in Felton, Califormia.  It opened the year I was born having been converted from a Presbyterian Church to a library.     http://www.santacruzpl.org/branches/8/   

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

Probably my all time favorite book was, A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle .  I’m sure it wasn’t the first book I read, or the  one that ignited a love of reading, but it sure helped.  I thoroughly enjoyed science fiction/fantasy, historical fiction and mysteries (Phyllis Whitney  and Nancy Drew mysteries being favorites).

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

I cannot think of one book in particular to recommend to a new or reluctant reader because I like to tailor my recommendations to the individual.  I work primarily with teens and I find that encouraging a reluctant teen reader involves finding a subject that draws them in.  Often it will be whatever their friends are reading, or books that were made into movies that caught their attention.  I have no problem recommending books that others might consider fads or poorly written because I feel that gives me a chance to encourage other books of the genre that might be better.  Draw them in with whatever they are willing or hungering to read and go from there. 

I go to the middle schools just prior to our summer reading programs to share our plans for the summer and some of the books I have read and enjoyed.  I encourage them to keep reading throughout the summer, even if it means reading the newspaper, magazines, graphic novels, or …..cereal boxes!  Because, reading anything will exercise their minds and make learning easier for them in the next school year. (and, yes, I tell them to read cereal boxes!)

Linda Pullicar:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

It was my mom, no doubt about it.  She took me to the library to check out books and also enrolled me in a children’s book-of-the-month club.  I vividly remember how thrilled I was to get Frederick by Leo Lioni in the mail.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

I can’t name a particular book, but there was always lots of reading material around and I dove into all of it.  I do remember hearing my three older siblings talking about Lord of the Rings and wanting so much to read it.  I did when I was in 5th grade and became such a Tolkien-head that I read them at least once every summer during my teen years.

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

It depends on the child.  For parents of children just starting to learn I often recommend Bob Books.  It is such a thrill for kids when they learn those first few letter sounds and then can read a whole book!  For children who don’t like to read I try non-fiction about whatever they’re in to.

Cathy Butterfield:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

 Definitely my mother, who began teaching me the basics of reading by reading to me and with me when I was four.  I think I was let loose on my own by the time I was five.

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

The first book I remember reading and re-reading is Wynken, Blynken and Nod, a pre-1960s issue of the poem with wonderful illustrations. 

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

Classic Marvel comics.  Action, plot, and great vocabulary.  Granted, the artwork is sexist and skewed, but you do want a springboard for reluctant readers, and the engagement of the reading brain is more important than the content.

Lori Bonner:

What person ignited a love for reading in you as a child and how?

                An Aunt. I did not see her often as she lived in the mid-west and abroad for most of my childhood. She always gave books for birthdays and holidays. While some of my siblings and cousins thought the books were nerdy, I loved them. One holiday when I was about 8, she sent me the EB White trifecta (Charlotte’s Web, Stuart Little, and Trumpet of the Swan). Charlotte’s Web was the book . . .

What book ignited a love for reading in you as a child and why?

            . . . that ignited my love of reading. When I finished this book, I knew I wanted to spend my life with books and print, to what extent I didn’t know. Charlotte brought several very memorable revelations to my young life.

I had a profound fear of spiders as a child and Charlotte brought that fear into perspective for me. She was kind and wise and resourceful—I liked her. Her personality, and of course EB White’s writing of her characteristics, helped me take a more rational view of my fear of arachnids. I still freak out about spiders but Charlotte made a palpable impact on that fear.

I also loved that she used her web to communicate very simply. This instilled in me a respect for the written word. I recall thinking how powerful her word(s) were to those who read them.

The story also instilled in me a sense that friendship is not always perfect or easy, and that we find friendship in unexpected places—a lesson that has served me well in life.

I still remember the feeling when I finished that book—‘I want to read, read, read.’

What book would you recommend to a new or reluctant reader and why?

                Answering this would require a reference interview with the reader. I would not recommend the same book to every reader.

Randy de Jong:

I am sorry that I am not an Idaho librarian yet, but simply a lurker from CA. My dad ignited my love of reading. We went to the library every week from before I can remember what age I was. I was always allowed to check out any book and as many as I was allowed. the first story is my choice of The last of the Mohicans in about 3rd grade. My dad and I struggled through about 30 pages together and then I struggled a bit longer. In fifth grade I checked it out again and read it alone and loved it. what a great war story. I was to young to realize the super romance that was included. I remember many books. Curious George was a favorite and the first chapter book I remember was called Three Stuffed Owls. I have not been able to locate it since becoming an adult. My recommendations for reluctant readers are Wild Things by Carmichael, Bluefish by Schmatz, and World Afire by Janeczcko (sp?). For reluctant readers that are progressing in their skills, the Bluford High series is a winner and gets read. This may be because of the demographics of my kids. Hope this helps.

 

 

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